So, one argument I’ve been hearing a lot this week from those who oppose same sex marriage has been that traditional marriage has “worked” for thousands of years.  I have to wonder what “working” means in this case.  If by “working” we mean just “continuing the human species”, then yes, we have done that.  I suppose that continuing to exist can be a success in itself.  But has traditional marriage truly been an effective way of living life?  Women, in particular, have held a shitty and repressed role in marriage for all those glorious thousands of years.  Has traditional marriage worked for them?  Many married human beings have spent their lives being miserable and unfulfilled in those marriages.  It almost makes me wonder if gays and lesbians really want to be a part of the marriage train.

But the basic truth about marriage is that it’s an economic contract.  That is what it has been about for straight people for centuries, with romantic love only being a recent addition to the mix.  That’s why most of the arguments in favor of same sex marriage have been about money, and rightly so.  And about the simple desire of people wanting to be treated like everyone else, which is completely understandable.

I see no good reason not to expand the definition of marriage to same sex partners.  I also can’t help but question the “sacred institution” of marriage itself.  Hopefully we can continue to re-invent our institutions and traditions in ways that make our lives happier and more fulfilling.

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Yes, to all of the people mourning the Supreme Court decision today:  it’s true, your liberty has died.  As someone who grew up under a universal health care system, I can tell you that it’s just complete tyranny.  They forced you to go to the hospital!  They forced you to take an ambulance!  Even if you weren’t sick!

Actually, no such thing happened, of course.  When we lived in Holland, we went to the doctor and got the same treatment for our problems as we do here, except that over there, we didn’t have to worry about the financial aspect of the situation.  The people we know in Europe who get a serious illness only have to stress about the illness, which is bad enough in itself.  They don’t also have to stress about going bankrupt.

Anyway, I’m pretty sure I’ve already mentioned all this in previous blogs, but it bears repeating, since people continue to tell fables about how in a single payer system, you will no longer have “freedom” when it comes to your health care.  The only loss of freedom which I will freely acknowledge happens under a single payer system is that you may end up paying higher taxes.  Speaking of which, I’m thinking of taking the train to the library tomorrow–yet more terrible impositions from my local government which I will have to suffer under.

On a small added note, I’m so glad I was wrong about how this decision went today.  For once, my pessimism was proven incorrect.  But I’m still feeling pessimistic about the election in Nov…hope I’m just as wrong about that one!

Okay, so that Plan B I had in case everything went to hell?  I hate to be a pessimist *again*, but it seems to have flown out the window and bounced out the door.  At least one aspect of it.

I was hoping that if we truly went to Hades in a conservative handbasket, I would be able to focus on local political action.  Specifically, I had imagined that if the Affordable Care Act was struck down by the Supremes, there would be ways for progressive activists to make universal health care happen here in Oregon.  We’re a liberal state, so it didn’t seem like a stretch.  Or I could finally give in to my mother’s nagging and move East, to Vermont or Massachusetts, one of the states that had a good health care system already in place.

Now I’m hearing from various places that if the individual mandate is rejected by the court, this will automatically make the individual mandate in these state programs unconstitutional as well, and it will mean that most of these plans will come to an end.  I’m hearing this from fellow liberals, not conservatives.

Is this true?  I really hope it isn’t.  If it is, there’s nowhere left to go.  Every place in America, even the places which would like to have universal coverage, will be stuck with the abuses of the status quo system.

There’s always the option of going overseas:  plenty of countries which not only have universal health care, but take it for granted and don’t have to deal with huge political fights about it.  But as I’ve said before, I just don’t see myself leaving this country.  I have too many friendships, people I care about—I have roots here now.  I’ve grown to love this place.

So, Plan C—if things are going down in flames and there’s not much I can do about it, I’m going to sit back and enjoy the bread and circuses, and the good company.  If we’re headed in the direction I think we are, and I end up living in the slums, at least I’ll be with my friends!

Thought I’d stick the happy ending in the title since my previous post was all about how I don’t believe in them.

Maybe it’s just people trying to put a positive spin on the situation, but I’m hearing more and more about how the Supreme Court striking down health care reform could be a good thing.  The idea being that the potential of health care reform going away will scare or upset voters enough to increase Obama’s re-election chances, and that it will give the Obama campaign more negative material to throw at the Republicans.  Apparently it might also be a good opportunity to re-inspire some of those progressives who have become disillusioned with Obama.

I have to say that I’m not feeling very hopeful about the health care ruling right now.  Perhaps I’m taking the unpleasant questioning of the Justices at face value.  Am I the one Eeyore in the crowd who’s not seeing the silver lining here?  Could a bad ruling by the Court indeed lead to a better outcome in the end?

Well, my hope is that the ruling does not turn out like I fear it will, and that health care reform remains in place.  This plan will help so many uninsured and underinsured Americans, and it has already changed things for the better in my own insurance industry.  No amount of strategizing about elections or imagined political gains could make losing it worthwhile to me.